Our New Visual Identity

Even after a decade, conceiving a film festival and bringing it to reality remains an act of resistance – and persistence. We take great pride in having cultivated our festival throughout all this time. Evidently, we couldn’t have done this all by ourselves: not only have we constantly strived to provide the best experience for our audience, we’ve always had them on our side. Olhar de Cinema is our gathering place, where we assemble to strengthen ourselves and move forward.

Hence, as we enter our 10th year, we look to the past before envisioning the future: this year’s visual identity stems from a reimagining of our first edition, designed by artists Pedro Giongo and Francisco Gusso from Estúdio Tijucas, who were also responsible for the visual creation of the festival’s second and third editions. A tribute therefore to all the people and films that have been part of our history as much as a milestone for this ten-year cycle, which now closes to give way to a new one. It is more than fitting that Francisco Gusso is the artist behind the illustrations for the visual identity of the festival’s 10th edition, who revisited his own work to devise an art that establishes a dialogue between the festival’s history and contemporaneity. Furthermore, our tenth visual identity includes graphic design and layout by artists Milena Fransolino and Lívia Zafanelli, also longtime partners of the festival.

One of the strong suits of last year’s edition, held online for the first time, was the opportunity to reach people unable to travel to Curitiba to participate in person – and we remain very enthusiastic about this possibility. While we once gathered in front of the big screen, now (for now) the monitors unite us. Once again, although against our wishes, for reasons of force majeure and our obligation to care for each other, the festival will take place entirely online. We thus invite you to embark in your homes and monitors once again, across the most varied regions and in the most diverse ways, so that we may, despite our physical distance, continue to become increasingly closer.

The crowded theater and chats in the lobby, before and after screening sessions, will have to wait a little longer. We will share experiences, memories, and emotions through our own screens until the time comes for us to meet again, when we shall share new and unforgettable stories. Now, the audience in theater rooms gives way to connections and connectivity across multiple screens. We ask that you welcome us in your homes so that, at the earliest opportunity, we may welcome you in ours: the movie theater. We underpin the message that, no matter how, cinema persists.